Tuesday, April 04, 2006

Teacher's lounge goes global

Web journals become the new fly on the wall

It was only a matter of time. Teachers have entered the blogosphere.

Many teachers' blogs are merely personal journals or opportunities for professional networking. But look out for the ones that are technology's answer to the teacher's lounge - complete with professional chit-chat, catty remarks about colleagues and - gasp! - gripes about students. More from Valerie Strauss of the Washington Post.


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7 comments:

elementaryhistoryteacher said...

I try very hard for my posts to not become rants about issues of the day, however, sometimes they do. I have been blogging since January and have tried to remain true to the purpose of my weblog. I think I've done a fairly good job, but it has made more thoughtful as I go through the day. I find myself remembering posts I've seen on other blogs and can sometimes apply those things to what I'm doing. I certainly don't plan to stop blogging anything soon.

DCS said...

Elementaryhistoryteacher: I think ranting and blogging go hand-in-hand. Feel free to rant here at any time. :-)

Your posts are very thoughtful - your site chock-full of information. I encourage other readers to pay you a visit. Thanks for stopping by.

Rose said...

Teachers have to ventilate too. I betcha folks blogging in high places everywhere.

letter shredder said...

Most of my college professors have their own commentary sites. It is really helpful coz when I get to meet them for dinner or coffee, I already know what we would talk about ;)

DCS said...

Rose: I think you're right.

Letter Shredder: Cool. I wish I had had this advantage with my college professors!

Brea said...

I had a professor once tell me never to eat my lunch in the teachers lounge. She said hearing what other teachers said about particular students could inadvertently affect your professionalism toward that student. Same goes for student files. Don't read them until there is a problem...

DCS said...

Brea: Your professor has given you something to think about. As a parent, I've experienced teachers having inappropriate conversations about my child in the teacher's lounge. Unfortunately, this has happened on more than one occasion. Each time it affected my child negatively. I was livid - and I let the teachers and principal know (respectfully, yet firmly)that I expected all teachers to adhere to professional standards.

By the way, Brea, I hope all is well in your world.